Posts Tagged ‘capital expenditures’

Unexpected Cash Flow Issues

A company may experience unexpected cash flow issues, and even though unexpected it’s not unusual. How can that be? Read the rest of this entry »

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Consider a Variety of Business Information

Do you consider a variety of business information when making decisions, or are you stuck in the habit of only looking at a few things you think are important? Read the rest of this entry »

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The Latest is Not Always the Greatest

We live in a time of constant change. As a result of this and effective marketing, some companies get people to buy things they don’t really need. What do I mean by that? Read the rest of this entry »

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Unplanned Obsolescence

We’re all familiar with the concept of planned obsolescence, but what about unplanned obsolescence. Planned obsolescence is when a product is designed to have only a limited life because it becomes outdated due to loss of functionality, appearance, customer appeal, or perhaps simply wears out. In general, planned obsolescence is somewhat intentional, the idea being that customers will either have to or desire to replace a product when is becomes obsolete. Read the rest of this entry »

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Actual Company Debt

Do you really know your actual company debt? This may seem like a silly question, but there is more to it than you may think. Let me explain.

Leases

There is a proposal from U.S. and international accounting regulators to change how a company should record and account for what is referred to as operating leases. Here I just want to consider the impact on the lessee. First, let’s look at some Read the rest of this entry »

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Cash Flow Coverage Ratios

There are several cash flow coverage ratios. Let’s look at two that impact all sizes of companies, including small ones.

Some Preliminaries

The reason I will only discuss two of these ratios is that some of the others rarely impact small companies that are privately and/or closely owned. In both of the ratios we will look at OCF stands for operating cash flow. As a reminder, OCF is calculated as:

Net Income adjusted for non-cash charges and changes in current assets and liabilities. Again for this calculation net income is exclusive of Read the rest of this entry »

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Free Cash Flow Versus Operating Cash Flow

I’ve been writing recently about cash flow, specifically in regards to important ratios to interpret it. The free cash flow to operating cash flow ratio is a useful measurement. Let’s see how it is calculated and what it means.

First Some Definitions

Generally free cash flow (abbreviates as FCF) is considered to be operating cash flow minus capital expenditures. (See Importance of Free Cash Flow)

Operating cash flow (OCF) is calculated as net income adjusted for non-cash charges and changes in current assets and liabilities. (See Operating Cash Flow Defined) In this calculation net income does not show the effect of interest and income taxes, so it is actually earnings before interest and income taxes (Abbreviated EBIT).

Calculating the Free Cash Flow to Operating Cash Flow Ratio

The formula for calculating the free cash flow to operating cash flow ratio, expressed as a percentage is: Read the rest of this entry »

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Importance of Free Cash Flow

In some previous posting I discussed how important it was to convert profits to cash. See Cash Flow – The Bottom Line for more on this. Now let’s look at cash from a different perspective.

Free Cash Flow Defined

Generally free cash flow is considered to be operating cash flow minus capital expenditures. This recognizes that capital spending for things like equipment is necessary if a company is to remain competitive. These capital expenditures help a company become more efficient or even allow them to Read the rest of this entry »

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