Inventory

Inventory Management Shortcut

Inventory can be one of the most difficult assets to manage. It doesn’t have to be this way if an inventory management shortcut is utilized. Read the rest of this entry »

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Avoiding Obsolete Inventory

Why do so many companies have difficulty disposing of slow-moving inventory? Inaction can be costly.

If It’s Not Selling

I’ve worked for or consulted for a few companies that seemed to struggle greatly with inventory control. Frequently they simply hated to acknowledge that certain items were not selling. Interestingly these same companies Read the rest of this entry »

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Too Many QuickBooks Items

QuickBooks items are one of its most powerful features, if used correctly and wisely. If you use QuickBooks, perhaps you have encountered one of the following issues with items:

  1. You have exhausted or are close to exhausting the list limits
  2. You have so many inventory or non-inventory item numbers that you are overwhelmed

Here are some thoughts on using items in QuickBooks that may save you some headaches.

Know the Limits of Items

Each version of QuickBooks has limits for list. For example, in QuickBooks Pro 2014 the limit for item lists is 14,500. That means that the total of Read the rest of this entry »

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QuickBooks Two Sided Items Save Time

One of the main benefits to delving into QuickBooks in detail is to accomplish things in less time. Two sided items are one of those shortcuts. In the posting Two Common QuickBooks Mistakes I indicated just a little of the problems that can occur in QuickBooks. Not taking advantage of some very helpful features is another.

What are Two Sided Items

In QuickBooks two sided items are items that will impact more than one account. Some items by default are two sided. For example, when you Read the rest of this entry »

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Inventory Days on Hand Analysis

In two articles around three years ago called 3 Low Cost Sources of Cash – Part 1 and Small Inventory – Big Benefits I discussed some of the benefits of keeping inventory to a level that would meet needs but would not be excessive. Let’s now look at a way to analyze inventory called inventory days on hand.

The Formula

The calculation for inventory days on hand is straight forward and is as follows:

(Inventory Balance / COGS) * 365 where COGS stands for Cost of Goods Sold. Let’s use the same numbers used in the first article mentioned above. If the inventory on hand is $1,000,000 and the annual cost of goods sold is $3,000,000 then the inventory days on hand is calculated as follows: Read the rest of this entry »

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Misleading Financial Information

The blog posting Two Dangerous Financial Illusions looked mainly at sales and profitability and how these can often be misleading. Let’s look at some more areas where misleading financial information may present.

Overvaluation of Receivables

Whenever a company undergoes an audit (and to a lesser degree a review), there are certain items on the financial statements that warrant extra scrutiny. A main one is accounts receivable.

One common way that accounts receivable may be over-valued is when Read the rest of this entry »

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Reducing Inventory Means Just That

Reducing inventory means just that may sound like a silly statement, but you’d be surprised how much sillier responses may be.

A Little Background

A number of years ago I took on a new client that I later discovered was in serious Read the rest of this entry »

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Excessive Debt

If you have not already heard, the city of Detroit, Michigan is planning to default on a large portion of its debt and probably reduce pension payouts. So what is the lesson for your business?

Borrow Carefully

There are times when a business really does need to borrow to continue growing. However, there are also times when a business may borrow for the wrong reasons. In the case of Detroit and many other municipalities, commitments were likely made that far exceeded reasonable expectations of tax collections. One reason this could have happened was to avoid the Read the rest of this entry »

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Current or Long-Term Debt

There are many ways for a company to get into financial difficulties. One that is very common is misuse of debt. In a past blog, the risk of allowing accounts receivable to become overdue was discussed (see 3 Reasons Past Due Receivables May be Worthless). Also, in the blog posting 80/20 Rule for Receivables Management a way to help manage receivables was discussed. Another leading cause of financial distress is the mismanagement of inventory. See 3 Low Cost Sources of Cash – Part 1 for an example of the impact of this.

The problems of excess receivables and inventory are relatively easy to understand. But, the misuse of debt is a little more hidden.

What Kind of Credit Problem?

When people think of credit problems they are normally thinking in terms of Read the rest of this entry »

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Old is New

If you have been around a while, you’ve had the opportunity to see a number of products some and go. By go I don’t necessarily mean they no longer exist, but just that their popularity has dramatically decreased.

Some Examples

Do you remember Tickle Me Elmo, Cabbage Patch Dolls, Pet Rocks, Hula Hoops, Yo-Yo’s, and Beanie Babies? While these products still exist, all have seen better days as to their popularity. The point is that each had its day. For example, there was a time Read the rest of this entry »

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